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27_New_CDBy the seventies, the spaghetti western genre had started to fade a bit. But the two Trinity films had breathed new life into it. Comedies became the go-to and, as was usual in the genre, other producers tried to cash in on popular franchises. We got a slew of Trinities in titles, although sometimes they had nothing to do with the films. At least here, there was a town named Trinity. Star Richard Harrison wrote, produced, and mostly directed this one. First director Renzo Geta was fired several days into the shoot with Harrison taking the reins.

Jesse Smith(Richard Harrison) and Lester O’Hara(Donal O’Brien) were halfJESSE_b15e69de25336ba40773bec8b0da51a1 brothers: same mother, different fathers. And as different as two men could possibly be. Jesse was a fun loving fellow, especially with the ladies, and very good with a gun. Lester was raised a Mormon and strictly nonviolent, trusting of authority in all it’s forms.

As the film opens, Lester is looking for his brother to inform him that their mother had died and left them a ranch in the town of Trinity. The ywo hadn’t seen each other since they were boys. Lester is a scary looking fellow with a thick beard and perpetual scowl.

downloadThey hook up when Jesse tries to rob Lester one night after beating a hasty retreat from an old man who caught him with his daughter. All he got away with was the long johns he wore and his gun belt. Lester recognizes him from the picture he carried, sent by Jesse to their mother. Jesse doesn’t believe Lester is his brother until he sees a scar on his brother’s butt that he remembers.

As the two brothers get to know each other, we learn they have opposite aims for their inheritance. Lester wants to build a church and Jesse the best whore house in the world. Their problem is the town of Trinity is mostly filled with crooks. Not to mention it’s the end of a gold rush in the area.

They find their land is held by three men employing virtual slave labor huntingDCF 1.0 for gold, mostly played out by this time. Lester tries to talk them out of it, getting dunked for his troubles and Jesse has to step in, blasting guns from thier hands and running them off.

The humor in the film, such as it is, comes from Lester trying to reform his brother and Jesse’s resistance. They find a bit of gold, only to have it stolen on the bank’s horse train, all the guards and officials killed. Jesse tries to save it, only to learn that Lester has unloaded his gun. Lester gets them into a prize fight(fifty dollar entry fee, four hundred if they can knock the champ out). Lester has all kinds of excuses why he can’t fight the man(nonviolent, a hernia, etec.)They are forced to wash dishes to pay for their meal after the bank is robbed, where Lester has deposited their winnings. Next they take a job from a man promising they can shovel their way to wealth. The shoveling part turns out to be scooping up buffalo turds to be dried and sold as fuel.

Sam_1288Two outlaw gangs control the area. Poker(Gino Marturano), so known for his skill at gambling, controls one. Blondie(Federico Boido, billed as rick Boyd) the other. They are meeting to settle who will reign. Jesse and Lester slip in and call Poker on his claim to be the best gambler. A dice game follows with Jesse switching the dice at opportune times to clean the man out. They manage to outwit the gangs and escape.

The pair split up and Lester manages to get away with all the money. Still trying to reform his brother away from the whore house idea. The stage is held up, Lester wounded in the head just as Jesse arrives to claim his half of the money. One gets away with the loot as Jesse tries to help Lester. Turning him over to a traveling doctor, who says he can take out the brain, remove the bullet, and put the brain back into Lester’s head. “A simple operation!” He declares.

Jesse realizes his dream, Lester returns to destroy it, and the final shoot-out is decently staged. The music by Carlo Savina is a bit goofy, but perfectly fits the style of the movie. Not a great western, but decent. About a C.

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